Multiple challenges for people after transitioning to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study.

Multiple challenges for people after transitioning to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study.

Publication date: Mar 08, 2019

Transitioning to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis (SPMS) is demanding for both patients and healthcare professionals. The particular challenges and the ways patients cope are poorly understood. The present study examines what challenges people face when diagnosed with SPMS by exploring experiences of people who have transitioned recently (up to 5 years).

Semistructured qualitative interviews at two time points a year apart. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

UK.

We interviewed 21 people at baseline and 17 participated in the follow-up interviews.

The majority of participants reported expecting to transition to SPMS, and the diagnosis did not make much difference to them. Participants described increasing emotional and physical challenges after transitioning to SPMS and between the first and second interviews. Planning, using distractions and maintaining social roles helped participants cope with the increased challenges. The same coping strategies were used between the two interviews. Participants felt there was not much left to do regarding the management of their symptoms. A key theme was the sense of abandonment from healthcare services after transitioning to SPMS.

After transitioning to SPMS, people are faced with multiple challenges. Participants described a lack of directions for symptoms management and lack of support from the healthcare system. An integrated multidisciplinary healthcare approach is crucial at the progressive stage of the disease to alleviate feelings of helplessness and promote symptom management.

Open Access PDF

Bogosian, A., Morgan, M., and Moss-Morris, R. Multiple challenges for people after transitioning to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study. 17488. 2019 BMJ Open (9):3.

Concepts Keywords
Coping Spms
Healthcare Multiple sclerosis
Multiple Sclerosis Self management
Progressive Multidisciplinary healthcare
Symptom Symptom management
Healthcare professionals ways

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT EGR3
drug DRUGBANK Gold
disease MESH development
disease MESH syndromes
gene UNIPROT SAGE1
disease MESH relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis
gene UNIPROT TACR2
gene UNIPROT INTU
gene UNIPROT COL9A3
gene UNIPROT COMP
gene UNIPROT COL9A1
gene UNIPROT COL9A2
gene UNIPROT SCN8A
gene UNIPROT ZBTB8OS
disease MESH Mult
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2A
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2B
gene UNIPROT MENT
drug DRUGBANK Trestolone
disease DOID anxiety
disease MESH anxiety
gene UNIPROT RNMT
gene UNIPROT MET
gene UNIPROT SLTM
drug DRUGBANK Methionine
disease MESH lifestyle
gene UNIPROT NHS
drug DRUGBANK Oxygen
gene UNIPROT FURIN
disease MESH tremor
gene UNIPROT REG1A
gene UNIPROT CDKN2D
gene UNIPROT IL23A
gene UNIPROT F9
gene UNIPROT CDKN2A
gene UNIPROT NXT1
gene UNIPROT CDKN2B
gene UNIPROT MRPL28
gene UNIPROT SUB1
gene UNIPROT SIRPA
disease MESH urinary tract infections
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
gene UNIPROT ELL
disease MESH Men
gene UNIPROT ALG3
gene UNIPROT NR4A2
gene UNIPROT REST
gene UNIPROT BAD
disease MESH Weight gain
disease MESH shock
gene UNIPROT CYREN
gene UNIPROT TNFSF10
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
drug DRUGBANK Etoperidone
gene UNIPROT TNFSF13
gene UNIPROT ANP32B
gene UNIPROT PDC
gene UNIPROT SLC25A37
gene UNIPROT MSC
disease DOID PPMS
gene UNIPROT AICDA
disease MESH Divorced
disease MESH depression
drug DRUGBANK Coenzyme M
gene UNIPROT CEP55
disease MESH uncertainty
disease MESH relapses
disease DOID RRMS
disease MESH cognitive dysfunction
disease MESH sclerosis
disease MESH diagnosis
gene UNIPROT FANCE
gene UNIPROT ELOVL6
disease DOID face
gene UNIPROT COPE
disease DOID secondary progressive multiple sclerosis
disease MESH secondary progressive multiple sclerosis
disease MESH Multiple

Original Article

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