Parkinson’s disease study reveals how cancer drug reduces toxic protein in brain

Parkinson’s disease study reveals how cancer drug reduces toxic protein in brain

Publication date: Mar 14, 2019

The research team used a single low dose of Novartis’ leukemia drug Tasigna (nilotinib) in a phase II clinical trial in Parkinson’s disease patients.

The investigators, who filed their findings in the Pharmacology Research Perspectives journal, said that low dose of nilotinib brought down levels of a toxic protein that inhibits the brain from using dopamine stored in tiny vesicles in brain areas that may regulate movement.

Researchers studied levels of 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) dopamine breakdown products in the CSF that bathe the brain and spinal cord of patients, after administration of nilotinib or placebo.

In the placebo arm, DOPAC and HVA were at low levels in the CSF compared to the nilotinib arm, indicating that the brain was using substantially more dopamine in the latter.

Concepts Keywords
Acid Inflammation
Biomarkers Chemical compounds
Brain Branches of biology
Cerebral Spinal Fluid Drugs
Clinical Trial Neurotransmitters
Dopamine Catechols
Georgetown Dopamine agonists
HVA Nilotinib
Inflammation Pyridines
Leukemia Pyrimidines
Metabolism Alpha-synuclein
Neurons 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid
Nilotinib Alpha
Novartis
Parkinson
Placebo
Plasma
Spinal Cord
Vesicles

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT TREM2
gene UNIPROT LAMC2
gene UNIPROT CSF2
disease MESH inflammation
pathway BSID Dopamine metabolism
disease MESH multiple
pathway BSID Release
drug DRUGBANK Dopamine
gene UNIPROT ARMC9
gene UNIPROT AKR1A1
drug DRUGBANK Nilotinib
disease DOID leukemia
disease MESH leukemia
disease DOID cancer
disease MESH cancer

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