A new role for sensory signals in the brain discovered

A new role for sensory signals in the brain discovered

Publication date: Apr 11, 2019

Now, Rutgers scientists have discovered that sensory signals in the brain’s cerebral cortex, which plays a key role in controlling movement and other functions, have a different pattern of connections between nerve cells and different effects on behavior than motor signals. The striatum, which integrates signals from the sensory and motor areas of the cerebral cortex, is severely compromised in diseases such as Parkinson’s and Huntington’s. “We found that stimulation of sensory cortex signals caused mice to stop their actions during a behavioral task, but motor cortex signals caused them to perform the task more impulsively,” said senior author David J. Margolis, an assistant professor in the Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick.

Concepts Keywords
Basketball Blocq’s disease
Behavioral Neuroscience Nervous system
Brain Motor cortex
Cerebral Cortex Striatum
Christian Neuroscience
Cortex Cerebral cortex
Current Biology Sensory cortex
Huntington Brain
Mice
Motor Areas
Motor Cortex
Movement Disorders
Nerve
Neurological
New Brunswick
Newark
Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
Paradiso
Parkinson
Psychiatric Disorders
Rutgers
Rutgers University
Sensory Cortex
Striatum

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT TIE1
disease MESH movement disorders
disease MESH obsessive compulsive disorder
disease DOID obsessive compulsive disorder
gene UNIPROT MAP6
gene UNIPROT KCNK3
disease DOID Arts
gene UNIPROT PRPS1
gene UNIPROT SEPT4
gene UNIPROT EGR3

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