Fatigue, depression, and quality of life in children with multiple sclerosis: a comparative study with other demyelinating diseases.

Fatigue, depression, and quality of life in children with multiple sclerosis: a comparative study with other demyelinating diseases.

Publication date: Apr 11, 2019

To evaluate fatigue, depression, and quality of life (QoL) of children with multiple sclerosis and compare to other acute demyelinating syndromes (ADS).

Children followed in the National Referral Centre of rare inflammatory brain and spinal diseases were included in this study. The Expanded Disability Status Scale, the fatigue severity scale, the Multiscore Depression Inventory for Children, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory were used for evaluation.

Thirty-seven children (23 females, 14 males) were included in this study. Multiple sclerosis was diagnosed in 26 children and ADS in 11 children. Although not significant, severe fatigue was less frequently reported by patients with multiple sclerosis than children with ADS (44% vs 63%, p=0.2). Depression was reported more often in the multiple sclerosis group compared to the ADS group (24% vs 18%, p=0.6). Concerning the QoL in patients with multiple sclerosis, both parents and children reported poor emotional and school functioning. Physical and social functioning were rated as being good in both groups, and was significantly higher in the children’s group (p=0.007).

This study highlights the importance of fatigue and depression in children with ADS and particularly in paediatric onset multiple sclerosis. Moreover, difficulties in school and emotional functioning were the main concerns for parents and children in the multiple sclerosis group which need to be taken in account during their care and treatment proposal.

Invisible signs such as fatigue and depression affect all forms of acute demyelinating syndromes (ADS) in children. Depression seems to be higher in children with multiple sclerosis than with other forms of ADS. Fatigue seems to be lower in children with multiple sclerosis than with other forms of ADS. Children with multiple sclerosis and their parents are most concerned with emotional and academic functioning.

Florea, A., Maurey, H., Le Sauter, M., Bellesme, C., Sevin, C., and Deiva, K. Fatigue, depression, and quality of life in children with multiple sclerosis: a comparative study with other demyelinating diseases. 17740. 2019 Dev Med Child Neurol.

Concepts Keywords
Brain Major depressive disorder
Demyelinating Diseases Fatigue
Depression Demyelinating disease
Fatigue Neurological disorders
Multiple Sclerosis Nervous system
Paediatric Depression
Spinal Diseases Medicine
Autoimmune diseases
Multiple sclerosis
Organ systems
Comparative demyelinating diseases
Lower multiple sclerosis
Parents multiple sclerosis
Study Multiple sclerosis
Significant severe fatigue

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH spinal diseases
disease MESH syndromes
disease MESH demyelinating diseases
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
disease MESH depression

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