How Virtual Reality Can Improve The Quality Of Life For People With Dementia

How Virtual Reality Can Improve The Quality Of Life For People With Dementia

Publication date: May 10, 2019

Such benefits of VR also extend to those with dementia who experience poor memory, confusion, and display increased aggression towards family and caregivers, according to new research by Dr. Jim Ang and colleagues at the University of Kent.

The study equipped each patient with a VR headset to ‘visit’ one of five virtual environments (VEs): a cathedral, a forest, a sandy beach, a rocky beach, and a countryside scene.

One important finding from the study was that VR helped patients retrieve old memories by incorporating novel stimuli difficult to access as a result of poor and declining health and inability to reach from their limited and secure environment.

Researchers from the study shared insights from the VR study, including patient interactions at an arts session some weeks later in which one of the patients who had participated explained that it had been extremely helpful.

While Ang and his colleagues believe that a larger study will be necessary to validate their results, they also feel that patient response thus far indicates that VR has significant promise for those diagnosed with dementia: – . “

Ongoing refinements in VR technology-specifically the ability to produce 360-degree VR videos–may allow engineers tailor specific VEs for individual patients leading to greater patient satisfaction and enhanced quality of life.

Concepts Keywords
ACM Virtual Reality
Alzheimer Caregiver
Anxiety Alzheimer’s disease
Autism Dementia
Batter Neuroscience
Beach Human behavior
Cognitive RTT
Coping Strategy Disease
Dementia Anxiety depression
Depression Resuscitations
Deutsche Telekom Cognitive disorders
East Anglia Psychiatric diagnosis
Eating Disorders Psychiatry
Forest Learning disabilities
Glasgow
Goggles
Headset
Huntington
Kent
London
Medicine
Memory
Mobile Game
Northampton
PTSD
Retrieve Memories
Schizophrenia
SIGCHI
Social Interaction
Social Withdrawal
Tablets
Tailor
Virtual Reality

Semantics

Type Source Name
pathway BSID Alzheimers Disease
gene UNIPROT SLC25A1
gene UNIPROT TBATA
disease MESH visual
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
disease MESH cognitive decline
gene UNIPROT SSRP1
disease MESH satisfaction
gene UNIPROT AGRP
pathway BSID Release
gene UNIPROT ARTN
gene UNIPROT SEPT4
gene UNIPROT PRPS1
disease DOID arts
disease MESH social interaction
gene UNIPROT ANG
disease MESH confusion
disease MESH schizophrenia
disease DOID schizophrenia
disease DOID autism
disease MESH phobias
disease MESH autism
disease MESH PTSD
disease MESH depression
disease MESH Dementia
disease DOID Dementia
disease MESH anxiety
disease DOID anxiety
disease MESH eating disorders

Original Article

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