Integrated cancer tissue engineering models for precision medicine.

Integrated cancer tissue engineering models for precision medicine.

Publication date: May 11, 2019

Tumors are not merely cancerous cells that undergo mindless proliferation. Rather, they are highly organized and interconnected organ systems. Tumor cells reside in complex microenvironments in which they are subjected to a variety of physical and chemical stimuli that influence cell behavior and ultimately the progression and maintenance of the tumor. As cancer bioengineers, it is our responsibility to create physiologic models that enable accurate understanding of the multi-dimensional structure, organization, and complex relationships in diverse tumor microenvironments. Such models can greatly expedite clinical discovery and translation by closely replicating the physiological conditions while maintaining high tunability and control of extrinsic factors. In this review, we discuss the current models that target key aspects of the tumor microenvironment and their role in cancer progression. In order to address sources of experimental variation and model limitations, we also make recommendations for methods to improve overall physiologic reproducibility, experimental repeatability, and rigor within the field. Improvements can be made through an enhanced emphasis on mathematical modeling, standardized in vitro model characterization, transparent reporting of methodologies, and designing experiments with physiological metrics. Taken together these considerations will enhance the relevance of in vitro tumor models, biological understanding, and accelerate treatment exploration ultimately leading to improved clinical outcomes. Moreover, the development of robust, user-friendly models that integrate important stimuli will allow for the in-depth study of tumors as they undergo progression from non-transformed primary cells to metastatic disease and facilitate translation to a wide variety of biological and clinical studies.

Open Access PDF

Bregenzer, M.E., Horst, E.N., Mehta, P., Novak, C.M., Raghavan, S., Snyder, C.S., and Mehta, G. Integrated cancer tissue engineering models for precision medicine. 04580. 2019 PLoS One (14):5.

Concepts Keywords
Clinical Translation Tissue engineering
Designing Experiments Invasion
Mathematical Modeling Cancer pathology
Metastatic Stem cells
Organ Oncology
Precision Medicine Relevance vitro tumor
Repeatability Depth tumors
Reproducibility Progression maintenance tumor
Tissue Engineering Key aspects tumor
Tumor Physical chemical stimuli

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT TRIM37
gene UNIPROT SARS2
gene UNIPROT ALDH1A1
drug DRUGBANK Cisplatin
gene UNIPROT AMACR
gene UNIPROT LAT2
disease MESH recurrence
disease MESH death
gene UNIPROT TNMD
gene UNIPROT CYLD
drug DRUGBANK Tretamine
drug DRUGBANK Nitric Oxide
gene UNIPROT TEK
gene UNIPROT EEF1AKNMT
gene UNIPROT PLAT
disease DOID plat
drug DRUGBANK D-glucose
drug DRUGBANK Dextrose unspecified form
gene UNIPROT HAAO
drug DRUGBANK Vincristine
drug DRUGBANK Sorafenib
gene UNIPROT PDGFB
gene UNIPROT ARMC9
gene UNIPROT AKR1A1
drug DRUGBANK Gelatin
drug DRUGBANK Polyethylene glycol
gene UNIPROT MAL
gene UNIPROT MRTFA
gene UNIPROT TIRAP
gene UNIPROT DNMT1
gene UNIPROT CD69
gene UNIPROT CD5L
disease MESH drug toxicity
gene UNIPROT SLC35G1
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2A
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2B
gene UNIPROT GAST
gene UNIPROT PAGR1
gene UNIPROT GALNS
gene UNIPROT GEN1
gene UNIPROT PLEKHG5
disease MESH hypoxia
disease MESH estrogen
gene UNIPROT TBX1
gene UNIPROT HGF
gene UNIPROT IL6
gene UNIPROT SOS1
drug DRUGBANK Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor
disease MESH inflammation
gene UNIPROT RHOA
gene UNIPROT VEGFA
gene UNIPROT SGCB
gene UNIPROT SLC25A37
gene UNIPROT MSC
gene UNIPROT MENT
drug DRUGBANK Trestolone
gene UNIPROT RXFP2
disease MESH diagnosis
gene UNIPROT CARS
gene UNIPROT TRIM13
gene UNIPROT CXADR
gene UNIPROT CASR
gene UNIPROT NR1I3
gene UNIPROT PRKAR1A
gene UNIPROT SPG7
gene UNIPROT CEL
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
disease MESH tumor escape
gene UNIPROT CD40LG
disease DOID squamous carcinoma
disease MESH squamous carcinoma
drug DRUGBANK Fluorouracil
gene UNIPROT ERAL1
gene UNIPROT ESR1
pathway BSID Immune System
drug DRUGBANK Nonoxynol-9
gene UNIPROT TNFRSF10B
gene UNIPROT SPG21
gene UNIPROT SPACA9
gene UNIPROT TNF
disease MESH Dif
gene UNIPROT MAP6
disease MESH separated
gene UNIPROT STUB1
disease MESH multiple
pathway BSID Melanoma
disease DOID melanoma
disease MESH melanoma
drug DRUGBANK Pralatrexate
disease DOID pineoblastoma
disease MESH pineoblastoma
gene UNIPROT EGFR
gene UNIPROT THOP1
gene UNIPROT NR2E3
disease DOID ovarian carcinoma
drug DRUGBANK Gold
gene UNIPROT SSRP1
gene UNIPROT PTPRF
disease MESH dissociation
gene UNIPROT AKT1
gene UNIPROT PIK3CG
gene UNIPROT PIK3CB
gene UNIPROT PIK3CD
gene UNIPROT PIK3CA
gene UNIPROT MAPK3
disease DOID aids
disease MESH aids
gene UNIPROT DSC2
gene UNIPROT DSC1
gene UNIPROT DSC3
gene UNIPROT RCAN1
gene UNIPROT SLC22A3
gene UNIPROT ITK
gene UNIPROT MIXL1
disease MESH sti
gene UNIPROT EPHB2
gene UNIPROT MAPK1
disease MESH metastasis
drug DRUGBANK Alginic acid
drug DRUGBANK Coenzyme M
drug DRUGBANK Hyaluronic acid
gene UNIPROT WWTR1
gene UNIPROT TAZ
gene UNIPROT YAP1
pathway BSID Angiogenesis
gene UNIPROT SLC26A5
gene UNIPROT FURIN
disease MESH glioblastoma
drug DRUGBANK Sulodexide
gene UNIPROT ERBB2
drug DRUGBANK Rasagiline
gene UNIPROT CD44
disease DOID dish
gene UNIPROT ARTN
gene UNIPROT AGRP
drug DRUGBANK Oxygen
pathway BSID Signal Transduction
gene UNIPROT TBATA
gene UNIPROT TNFSF14
gene UNIPROT POMGNT1
gene UNIPROT DEPP1
gene UNIPROT GOPC
gene UNIPROT LARGE1
disease MESH micrometastasis
disease MESH genomic instability
pathway BSID Apoptosis
gene UNIPROT TFPI
disease MESH Tumorigenesis
gene UNIPROT MMRN1
gene UNIPROT EGR3
gene UNIPROT PIN1
gene UNIPROT FBN1
drug DRUGBANK Etodolac
disease MESH development
pathway BSID Translation
disease MESH multi
disease DOID cancer
disease MESH cancer

Original Article

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *