Here’s why Huntington’s disease attacks brain cells in human

Here’s why Huntington’s disease attacks brain cells in human

Publication date: May 13, 2019

“We are excited about this result because it may explain why the patient gets the in this area of the brain called the striatum,” said Srinivasa Subramaniam, Department of at Scripps Research- According to the study, a toxic protein linked to can move from neuron to neuron through a nanotube tunnel whose construction is initiated by a protein called Rhes.

People with inherit a damaged protein that is somehow complicit in destroying brain cells.

For this study, Subramaniam and colleague Manish Sharma, the of the study, looked at mouse neurons under a confocal microscope and saw that the cells formed sticky, string-like protrusions around 150 microns long which floated above the cells, connecting them.

They inserted the protein into the mouse brain cells, tagged it with fluorescence and then watched as it crossed over and crawled up to enter the neighbouring cell.

The Rhes protein exists in both mouse and human brains sick with Huntington’s disease.

In a 2009 study, Subramaniam found that Rhes also alters the protein’s structure making it more toxic to brain cells.

Subramaniam’s group continues to investigate what other proteins may be helping with tunnel construction and if other disease proteins move along these membranous highways.

Concepts Keywords
Brain Health
Brain Damage Medicine
Bridge Brain
Confocal Microscope Olney’s lesions
Endosomes Neuron
Fluorescence Medical terminology
Huntington Branches of biology
Lake Bridge
Lysosomes
Memory
Microns
Motor Control
Neuron
Neurons
Protein
Stigma
Striatum
Tunnel

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH death
gene UNIPROT MAGEE1
gene UNIPROT RASD2

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