Israeli Scientists Duplicate Patient’s Blood-Brain Barrier, Advance Personalized Medicine

Israeli Scientists Duplicate Patient’s Blood-Brain Barrier, Advance Personalized Medicine

Publication date: Jun 11, 2019

Israeli scientists at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have recently been successful in duplicating a Blood-Brain Barrier outside the patient’s body using stem cells and microfluidic chips, producing a functioning copy of a patient’s brain structure and thus advancing personalized medicine.

However, the scientists duplicated a critical brain structure, the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which functions as it would in the individual who donated the cells to make it.

For their study, a team co-chaired by Dr. Gad Vatine, of BGU’s Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell (RMSC) Research Center and the Department of Physiology and Cell Biology and by Clive N Svendsen, Ph. D of Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, genetically manipulated blood cells collected from individual’s into stem cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells, which can produce any type of cell in our bodies.

Although scientists have created blood-brain barriers outside the body before, the investigators said they believe this is the first time such a structure has been created from induced pluripotent stem cells that were derived from a patient, matched the patient’s DNA, and displayed a characteristic defect of the patient’s disease.

Concepts Keywords
Blood Stem cells
Blood Brain Barrier Chip technology
Blood Vessel Neurological disorder
Brain Human brain
California Neurology
Chips Circulatory system
Congenital Central nervous system
DNA Blood–brain barrier
Dudley Stem cells
Epilepsy Brain
FDA Anatomy
Gad Branches of biology
Gatekeeper Brain disorders
Herndon Chip technology
Huntington
Interact
Israel
Los Angeles
Microfluidic
Multiple Sclerosis
Negev
Neurological Diseases
Neurological Disorder
Neurons
Organ
Personalized Medicine
Pluripotent
Precision Medicine
Schizophrenia
Sinai
Stem Cells
Syndrome

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT GTF2IRD1
disease MESH brain disorders
gene UNIPROT BEST1
disease MESH Neurological disorders
disease MESH Multiple Sclerosis
disease DOID Multiple Sclerosis
disease MESH Alzheimer disease
disease DOID Alzheimer disease
disease MESH Huntington disease
disease DOID Huntington disease
gene UNIPROT GAD1
drug DRUGBANK Sulodexide
disease MESH Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome
disease DOID Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome
disease MESH congenital
gene UNIPROT STUB1
disease MESH epilepsy
disease DOID epilepsy
disease MESH schizophrenia
disease DOID schizophrenia

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