Studying Diverse Populations Will Strengthen Precision Medicine

Studying Diverse Populations Will Strengthen Precision Medicine

Publication date: Jun 21, 2019

June 20, 2019 – Precision medicine could hold the key to more targeted, personalized care delivery, better outcomes, and diminished health disparities, but in order to turn these visions into reality, researchers have to study genetic mutations in diverse populations.

In one of the largest genetic studies of Hispanics and Latinos, African Americans, Asians, and other minorities, a team from Rutgers University examined genetic variants in nearly 50,000 people of non-European descent.

The findings revealed that a genetic mutation linked to blood sugar levels occurs in one percent of Hispanic/Latino people and about six percent of African Americans, but the mutation is rare in people of European descent.

Most genome-wide studies have been comprised of white people of European ancestry, the team said, but scientists have shown that the genetic mutations that contribute to chronic diseases may not be the same in all ethnicities.

-A genetic variant with a big effect in people of European descent may have a smaller effect in other populations, and vice versa. “

-The promise of precision medicine that improves health will not be achieved with studies based solely on people of primarily European ancestry,” said Tara Matise, a senior author and professor who chairs the Department of Genetics in the School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers University – New Brunswick.

Concepts Keywords
2016 Federal Genotyping
African Americans Human genetic variation
Blood Race and health
Blood Pressure Social constructionism
Blood Sugar Healthcare quality
Cardiovascular Race
CDC Kinship and descent
Chronic Diseases Anthropology
CMS Social inequality
Diabetes Branches of biology
Differential Articles
European Americans Academic disciplines
Frequency Diseases
Genetic Chronic diseases
Genetic Mutation Inflammation
Genetic Mutations Native Americans diabetes
Genetic Variant Players healthcare space
Genome Healthcare disparities
Genotyping Racial
Glucose
Healthcare
Hispanic
Hypertension
Inflammation
Kidney
Latino
Latinos
Lipids
Medicare
Mutation
Native Americans
Nature
PhD
Rutgers
Socioeconomic
The Promise

Semantics

Type Source Name
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
gene UNIPROT EAF2
disease MESH inflammation
disease MESH lifestyle
drug DRUGBANK Dextrose unspecified form
drug DRUGBANK D-glucose
gene UNIPROT TNFSF14
disease MESH chronic diseases
disease MESH hypertension
disease DOID hypertension
disease MESH type 2 diabetes
gene UNIPROT CD2AP
gene UNIPROT MMD
gene UNIPROT PDC
disease DOID Arts
gene UNIPROT PRPS1
gene UNIPROT SEPT4

Similar

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *