Blocking Sortilin Protein May Be Potential Treatment for Chronic Nerve Pain, Mouse Study Suggests

Blocking Sortilin Protein May Be Potential Treatment for Chronic Nerve Pain, Mouse Study Suggests

Publication date: Jun 24, 2019

Inhibiting the function of a protein called sortilin – an important regulator of nerve damage-induced pain in mice – may represent a potentially effective strategy for treating chronic pain in humans, including those with multiple sclerosis, a study in mice suggests. -Once nerve damage has occurred, and the nerve cells go into overdrive, molecules are released which start a domino effect that ultimately triggers pain,” Mette Richner, PhD, professor at Aarhus University and lead author of the study, said in a press release. In other words, neurotensin acts as a -brake” for the pain signals, and sortilin drives these pain signals by inhibiting neurotensin – essentially acting as a -brake for the brake,” the researchers said. -The [pain signals’] domino effect can be inhibited by a particular molecule in the spinal cord called neurotensin, and our studies show that the neurotensin is ‘captured’ by sortilin,” Richner said. -Our research is carried out on mice, but as some of the fundamental mechanisms are quite similar in humans and mice, it still gives an indication of what is happening in people suffering from chronic pain,” said Christian Vaegter, PhD, researcher at Aarhus University and co-senior author of the study.

Concepts Keywords
Aarhus Sortilin 1
Analgesic Peripheral neuropathy
BDNF Chronic pain
Brake Neuropathic pain
Christian Electrotherapy
Chronic Diseases Sensory systems
Chronic Pain Pain management
Diabetes Medicine
Disinhibition Nociception
Genetically Engineered Perception
Inhibitor MS
Mice Injury chronic diseases
Molecule Diabetes
Multiple Sclerosis Multiple sclerosis
Nerve Chronic pain humans
Neuropathic Pain Nerve Pain
Neurotensin
Overdrive
Pain
PhD
Protein
Puzzle
Signaling Control
Spinal Cord
Stimulus

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH suffering
disease MESH development
pathway BSID Release
gene UNIPROT PDC
disease MESH Nerve Pain
gene UNIPROT MAGEE1
disease MESH chronic pain
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
gene UNIPROT BDNF
disease MESH chronic diseases

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