Spasticity, gait, and balance in patients with multiple sclerosis: A cross-sectional study.

Spasticity, gait, and balance in patients with multiple sclerosis: A cross-sectional study.

Publication date: Jul 09, 2019

More than 80% of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) are affected by spasticity. Spasticity is known to reduce quality of life and contribute to additional symptoms, such as pain and reduced mobility, but the association between spasticity, balance, and mobility has not yet been established. Our aim was to examine whether a relationship exists between spasticity in the lower limbs, balance, and gait, as well as to explore the involvement of different muscle groups.

This study employed a cross-sectional design. Thirty patients with MS were included. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to examine spasticity in the ankle plantar flexors, knee extensors, and hip adductors. Balance was measured using the Mini-Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and gait with the 2-Minute Walk Test. The participants were tested once with no additional follow-up. Spearman’s correlation, recursive partitioning, and linear regression analyses were used to explore the association.

A significant correlation between gait distance and spasticity in the ankle plantar flexors (ρ = -.69, p

Norbye, A.D., Midgard, R., and Thrane, G. Spasticity, gait, and balance in patients with multiple sclerosis: A cross-sectional study. 18540. 2019 Physiother Res Int.

Concepts Keywords
Correlation Spasticity
Cross Balance
Gait Human leg
Hip Adductors Branches of biology
Knee Extensors Neurological disorders
Linear Regression
MAS
Mini
Multiple Sclerosis
Muscle
Pain
Plantar Flexors
Spasticity
Test

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH muscle spasticity
gene UNIPROT ST13
gene UNIPROT RPL29
gene UNIPROT HHIP
gene UNIPROT REG3A
gene UNIPROT MAS1
gene UNIPROT DNMT1
gene UNIPROT CD69
gene UNIPROT CD5L
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
disease MESH gait

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