Standing frame intervention improves life for people with multiple sclerosis, research shows

Standing frame intervention improves life for people with multiple sclerosis, research shows

Publication date: Jul 11, 2019

Credit: University of Plymouth A new study has shown that people in the advanced stage of multiple sclerosis (MS) experience significant improvements in movement and balance thanks to a specialised standing frame.

Led by the University of Plymouth and published today in The Lancet Neurology, the study in people with progressive MS also showed that the intervention appeared cost-effective, leading researchers to conclude that it could be routinely implemented within MS care throughout the UK.

The Oswestry standing frame is designed to help slow the development of these problems in people in the more advanced stages of the condition, by enabling them to regularly stand and carry out strengthening and balance exercises in a supported position, with the help of a friend or family member if needed.

The nationwide study saw 71 people with the condition randomly allocated to undertake the standing frame programme over 20 weeks, alongside their usual care.

Results showed that, on average, people who used the standing frame scored more highly on an assessment of their movement and balance function, as objectively assessed by a physiotherapist.

“I’d used a standing frame briefly in physiotherapy sessions after being diagnosed with MS in 2011, but fast-forward several years and the option came up to take part in the SUMS study, which saw me have to use the standing frame at home.

However, very little research had previously taken place into how to preserve and improve mobility in people with more severe disability, or how effective the standing frame was for this patient group.

This study shows that people severely disabled by MS are able to improve their motor function and balance with regular frame standing and, importantly, are able to self-manage the intervention over the long-term in their own homes with the help of family or carers.

of a home-based standing frame programme in people with progressive Multiple Sclerosis (SUMS): a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomised, controlled trial and cost-effectiveness analysis, The Lancet Neurology, .. . Citation: Standing frame intervention improves life for people with multiple sclerosis, research shows (2019, July 10) retrieved 11 July 2019 from This document is subject to copyright.

Concepts Keywords
Aisle Accessibility
Bladder Assistive technology
Bowel Medical equipment
Brain Standing frame
Central Nervous System Physical therapy
Clinical Trial Multiple sclerosis
Constipation Balance
Crutch Rehabilitation medicine
Devon Articles
Disability Health
Fair Dealing Physiotherapy
Lancet MS
Multiple Sclerosis Multiple sclerosis
Muscle Weakness
Neurology
NHS
NICE
NIHR
Norfolk
Norwich
Ordination
Oswestry
Pain
Physiotherapist
Physiotherapy
Plymouth
Pressure Ulcers
Progressive
Randomised Controlled Trial
Sedentary Lifestyle
Spinal Cord
Stiffness
Wheelchair

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH Community
disease MESH complications
disease MESH sedentary lifestyle
gene UNIPROT SSRP1
disease MESH multi
gene UNIPROT FASTK
gene UNIPROT RXFP2
gene UNIPROT SET
disease MESH development
disease MESH pressure ulcers
disease DOID constipation
gene UNIPROT NHS
drug DRUGBANK Nonoxynol-9
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2A
gene UNIPROT SMIM10L2B
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
disease DOID multiple sclerosis

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