Study Examines Gadolinium Deposits in MS Patients’ Brains, But Still Can’t Determine Relationship with Disease Severity

Study Examines Gadolinium Deposits in MS Patients’ Brains, But Still Can’t Determine Relationship with Disease Severity

Publication date: Jul 12, 2019

This post was originally published on this site The use of gadodiamide, a gadolinium-based contrast agent (GBCA) often used to help clinicians visualize brain structures in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, leads to the accumulation of gadolinium in certain regions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients’ brains early in the course of the disease, a study has found. Those findings, in the study -Cumulative gadodiamide administration leads to brain gadolinium deposition in early MS,” were published recently in Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). Results showed that at follow-up, almost half of the MS patients (49. 3%) had areas of high-gadolinium intensity in the dentate nucleus (a brain region responsible for controlling voluntary movements and cognition), while none of the controls had the same type of high-intensity gadolinium depositions in the same region. -Therefore, we cannot completely rule out that gadolinium deposition may have an impact on disease progression or clinical outcome,” Zivadinov said, adding that the findings from the study -should be incorporated into a risk-versus-benefit analysis when determining the need for GBCA administration in individual MS patients. ” The post Study Examines Gadolinium Deposits in MS Patients’ Brains, But Still Can’t Determine Relationship with Disease Severity appeared first on Multiple Sclerosis News Today. The post Study Examines Gadolinium Deposits in MS Patients’ Brains, But Still Can’t Determine Relationship with Disease Severity appeared first on BioNewsFeeds.

Concepts Keywords
Atrophy MRI
Brain Magnetic resonance imaging
Buffalo Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis
Cognition MRI contrast agent
Contrast Agent Cerebral atrophy
Contrast Agents Gadodiamide
Correlation Magnetic resonance imaging
Dentate Nucleus Lanthanides
Europe Gadolinium
FDA Chemical elements
Gadolinium Chemistry
Globus Pallidus Physical sciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging Aggressive disease
MRI MS
MRI Brain Scans Progression disease
Multiple Sclerosis
Neuroimaging
Neurology
PhD
Toxicity

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease DOID Multiple Sclerosis
drug DRUGBANK Nonoxynol-9
disease MESH Multiple Sclerosis
gene UNIPROT ELL
disease MESH men
disease MESH disease progression
gene UNIPROT IMPACT
pathway BSID Release
gene UNIPROT PDC
gene UNIPROT LARGE1
disease MESH community
disease MESH sclerosis
gene UNIPROT CYREN
drug DRUGBANK Gadolinium
gene UNIPROT SLC35G1
drug DRUGBANK Gadodiamide

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