Building the case for actionable ethics in digital health research supported by artificial intelligence.

Building the case for actionable ethics in digital health research supported by artificial intelligence.

Publication date: Jul 17, 2019

The digital revolution is disrupting the ways in which health research is conducted, and subsequently, changing healthcare. Direct-to-consumer wellness products and mobile apps, pervasive sensor technologies and access to social network data offer exciting opportunities for researchers to passively observe and/or track patients ‘in the wild’ and 24/7. The volume of granular personal health data gathered using these technologies is unprecedented, and is increasingly leveraged to inform personalized health promotion and disease treatment interventions. The use of artificial intelligence in the health sector is also increasing. Although rich with potential, the digital health ecosystem presents new ethical challenges for those making decisions about the selection, testing, implementation and evaluation of technologies for use in healthcare. As the ‘Wild West’ of digital health research unfolds, it is important to recognize who is involved, and identify how each party can and should take responsibility to advance the ethical practices of this work. While not a comprehensive review, we describe the landscape, identify gaps to be addressed, and offer recommendations as to how stakeholders can and should take responsibility to advance socially responsible digital health research.

Open Access PDF

Nebeker, C., Torous, J., and Bartlett Ellis, R.J. Building the case for actionable ethics in digital health research supported by artificial intelligence. 05019. 2019 BMC Med (17):1.

Concepts Keywords
Artificial Intelligence Cybernetics
BMC Computational neuroscience
Digital Artificial intelligence
Digital Revolution Emerging technologies
Ethics Academic disciplines
Healthcare Articles
Sensor Selection testing healthcare
Social Network Wellness products
Wild West Healthcare
Bioethics
Artificial intelligence

Semantics

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