Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis

Forgotten immune cells protective in mouse model of multiple sclerosis

Publication date: Aug 08, 2019

Credit: Marvin 101/Wikipedia A seldom-studied class of immune cells may reduce the friendly fire that drives autoimmune disease, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

In the study, to be published Aug. 7 in Nature, researchers tracked immune cells in the blood of mice with a disease akin to multiple sclerosis.

To their surprise, injecting mice with peptides recognized by these CD8 T cells reduced disease severity and killed disease-causing immune cells.

While the bulk of the study was done in mice, the researchers also showed that one of their central findings-an increase in CD8 T cells derived from single cells-held true in cells from people with multiple sclerosis.

Selectively activating suppressive CD8 T cells during autoimmune disease may help restore that balance, said Mark Davis, Ph. D., professor of microbiology and immunology and the study’s senior author.

Attack of the T cell clones In most cases, researchers don’t know what molecules trigger autoimmune diseases, which affect 23. 5 million Americans, according to the National Institutes of Health.

Resurrecting the Titanic The researchers found two peptides recognized by CD8 T cells involved in the disease.

Since CD8 T cells are mainly known for killing cancerous and infected cells, the scientists expected that activating these cells would worsen disease.

Activating the CD8 T cells by administering the two peptides consistently reduced or prevented disease in the mice.

To determine whether their mouse observations held up in humans, the researchers isolated CD8 T cells from the blood of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy donors.

It’s a sign that CD8 T cells in multiple sclerosis are homing in on something, and Davis’ team is now working to determine what these cells are recognizing and if some of them are suppressive.

The researchers also plan to test if suppressor CD8 T cells are involved in other autoimmune diseases.

Concepts Keywords
Antigen Akin multiple sclerosis
Autoimmune Paralysis multiple sclerosis
Autoimmune Disease MS
Autoimmune Diseases Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Autoimmunity Lead therapies diseases
Blood Autoimmunity treatment diseases
CD8 Autoimmune diseases
Celiac Disease Medical specialties
Crowdsourcing Immunology
Demyelination Medicine
Fair Dealing Branches of biology
Friendly Fire T cell
Glycoprotein Immune system
Howard Hughes Autoimmunity
Immune Cells Antigen
Immune Response Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Immune System CD4+/CD8+ ratio
Immunology Protective autoimmunity
Immunosuppressive
Lesion
Macrophages
Marion
Mark Davis
Membrane
Mice
Microbiology
MOG
Multiple Sclerosis
Myelin
Nature
Oligodendrocyte
Paralysis
Pathogen
Peptide
Peptides
Saligrama
Seesaw
Sequencing
Stanford Medicine
Suppressor
Titanic
Unearth
Yeast

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT LAT2
gene UNIPROT TNFSF14
disease DOID dish
gene UNIPROT LARGE1
gene UNIPROT CD3EAP
gene UNIPROT CAST
gene UNIPROT SLC6A2
gene UNIPROT EPHB1
gene UNIPROT ELK3
pathway BSID Immune System
disease DOID autoimmune disease
disease MESH autoimmune disease
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
disease MESH Demyelination
gene UNIPROT CD68
gene UNIPROT MOG
disease MESH experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
disease MESH paralysis
gene UNIPROT STAB2
disease MESH autoimmunity
gene UNIPROT MARK1
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
gene UNIPROT ARID1A
disease DOID celiac disease
disease MESH celiac disease

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