How Should Scientists’ Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

How Should Scientists’ Access To Health Databanks Be Managed?

Publication date: Sep 06, 2019

UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access.

KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption toggle caption KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library UK Biobank has granted 10,000 qualified scientists access to its large database of genetic sequences and other medical data, but other organizations with databases have been far more restrictive in giving access.

KTSDESIGN/Getty Images/Science Photo Library More than a million Americans have donated genetic information and medical data for research projects.

Only VA scientists and their collaborators are granted access to the vets’ medical records and genetic information.

Dr. J. Michael Gaziano, a VA scientist and principal investigator of the Million Veteran Program, says that so far there are 30 projects involving this huge data set.

The U. K. project has granted access to 10,000 qualified scientists, who can download its anonymized data and explore it.

UK Biobank has reported no security or privacy issues, but Gaziano still isn’t about to make the VA data in the U. S. as readily accessible.

Gaziano is trying to make the data more accessible to scientists in academia, but doing so is complicated by the fact that the data are housed on computers at the VA and the Energy Department; access is strictly controlled.

“We have families who have been here for three, four, five, six generations,” says Dr. Lincoln Nadauld, executive director of precision medicine and genomics, “and under our care at Intermountain Healthcare, we have taken care of families for multiple generations, so we have health information and health histories on those families and patients. “

“We don’t anticipate sharing this data outside of the Intermountain Healthcare databases, for example,” Nadauld says.

They would like to put the information on computer servers that scientists can access but which will not allow data to be downloaded.

Concepts Keywords
Albuquerque Biological databases
Amgen Bioinformatics
Bar Codes Branches of biology
Behavior Genetics Genetics
Bipolar Disease DeCODE genetics
Blood Biobank
Boston Intermountain
California Genomics
Cardiovascular Disease Basis disease
Closely Held Pharmaceutical giant
Diabetes
Genetic
Genetic Material
Genomics
Getty Images
Head Start
Hospital
Hypertension
Iceland
Intermountain Healthcare
Jesus Christ
Kaiser Permanente
Lincoln
NIH
NPR
Pennsylvania
Pharmaceutical
Philosophy
Principal Investigator
Privacy
PTSD
Richard Harris
Schizophrenia
Scientific Community
Selva
Sequencing
United States
Utah

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease DOID Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
gene UNIPROT NPTXR
drug DRUGBANK Methyprylon
disease DOID Diabetes Mellitus
disease MESH Diabetes Mellitus
gene UNIPROT ADRB2
gene UNIPROT ARSK
gene UNIPROT DBF4
gene UNIPROT ARID1A
disease MESH community
gene UNIPROT RXFP2
disease MESH privacy
disease DOID hypertension
disease MESH hypertension
disease MESH cardiovascular disease
disease MESH PTSD
disease DOID schizophrenia
disease MESH schizophrenia
gene UNIPROT SET
gene UNIPROT NR1H4
gene UNIPROT BFAR
gene UNIPROT LAT2
disease MESH men
gene UNIPROT LARGE1

Similar

Original Article

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *