C-reactive protein as an early marker of immune-related adverse events.

C-reactive protein as an early marker of immune-related adverse events.

Publication date: Sep 06, 2019

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are effective against a wide variety of cancers. However, they also induce a plethora of unique immune-related adverse events (irAEs). Since for many organ systems symptoms can be unspecific, differential diagnosis with progression of disease or infection may be difficult. C-reactive protein (CRP) has been suggested as a marker for infection. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of CRP in differentiating infectious causes from autoimmune side effects induced by ICIs.

In order to investigate the role of CRP in irAEs, we screened our patient data base. Only events with full infectious workup were included. In total 88 events of irAEs in 37 melanoma patients were analyzed. CRP levels before and during irAEs were evaluated. Statistical analyses were conducted using the Chi-square test for categorical variables.

At the onset of irAE, CRP rose in 93% of cases to a mean of 52.7 mg/L (CI 35.1-70.3) from 8.4 mg/L at baseline (normal 

Abolhassani, A.R., Schuler, G., Kirchberger, M.C., and Heinzerling, L. C-reactive protein as an early marker of immune-related adverse events. 24045. 2019 J Cancer Res Clin Oncol.

Concepts Keywords
Autoimmune Infectious autoimmune side
Differential Diagnosis Marker infection
Infection Diagnosis progression infection
Melanoma Medicine
Organ Medical specialties
Clinical medicine
Immune system
Cancer treatments
Blood tests
Immunologic tests
Intensive care medicine
C-reactive protein
Checkpoint inhibitor
CRP
Melanoma

Semantics

Type Source Name
pathway BSID Melanoma
disease DOID melanoma
disease MESH melanoma
gene UNIPROT BPIFA4P
gene UNIPROT CSRP1
disease MESH infection
disease MESH diagnosis
disease MESH cancers
gene UNIPROT CRP

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