Using music therapy to stimulate the brain can help address conditions ranging from PTSD to Parkinson’s

Using music therapy to stimulate the brain can help address conditions ranging from PTSD to Parkinson’s

Publication date: Oct 07, 2019

Music therapy isn’t about achieving musical goals, and the Music and Memory program, where custom playlists are curated for elderly people with Alzheimer’s and played for them on headset, is definitely not music therapy, they say.

It’s not just someone playing a guitar by someone’s bedside where you’re passive – it’s engagement,” says Carla Carnegie, a certified music therapist and founder of Willow Song Music Therapy Services in Otis Orchards.

While the earliest references to the therapeutic value of music in the U. S. date back to the late 18th century, the development of music therapy as a serious clinical profession kicked off in the 1940s, when the first academic programs in the field were founded.

“Music is a medium to help reach a therapeutic goal,” says Carlene Brown, director of the music therapy program at Seattle Pacific University.

Music therapy can address many of the issues facing people with Parkinson’s.

Music therapy may assist with healing from childhood trauma, help adolescents with behavioral health issues, and in particular, may be especially effective for people dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder.

A 2012 study found that people with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) who participated in music therapy saw greater improvements in their symptoms than those receiving cognitive behavioral therapy.

A 2017 U. S. Department of Veterans Affairs review of academic literature concluded that music therapy has potential as a useful tool to “reduce symptoms and improve functioning among individuals with trauma exposure and PTSD. “

One of Carnegie’s clients, a veteran with PTSD, experienced significant progress through music therapy.

For kids dealing with childhood trauma or other stressors, music therapy can provide a vital outlet for emotions and self-expression.

Aside from serving as an outlet, music therapy can also help regulate behavior and emotion for kids with severe behavioral issues.

According to a recent workforce survey and analysis conducted by the American Music Therapy Association, approximately 22 percent of music therapists reported working with kids in behavioral health settings, such as community health centers, juvenile detention facilities, schools and inpatient and outpatient treatment centers.

(Closer to home, Seattle Pacific University’s music therapy program runs a weekly drop-in program for homeless youth at New Horizons, a social service provider. )

At the Center for Music Therapy in Spokane, music therapist Kim McMillin works extensively with children who are on the autism spectrum.

Debbie Thomas, a mother of one of the kids, says that she’s seen substantial changes in her daughter since she began music therapy three years ago: “Her confidence in socializing has improved,” she says.

Concepts Keywords
Alzheimer Psychological trauma
Autism Psychotherapy
Autism Spectrum Behaviour therapy
Autistic Health
Bad Day Medicine
Braille Music therapy
Brain Military medicine
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Military psychiatry
Dopamine Military sociology
Drums Behaviorism
Emotion Posttraumatic stress disorder
Fine Motor Skills Articles
Fluid Cognitive behavioral therapy
Gait Music therapy
Gosh Strokes
Guitar
Headset
High School
Homeless
Improvisation
Interact
Juvenile Detention
Keyboard
Keyboards
Motor Neurons
Motor Skills
Muscle
Music Therapist
Music Therapists
Music Therapy
Neurology
Neuron
Neurons
Parkinson
Piano
Poor Muscle Tone
PTSD
Reward System
Seattle Pacific University
Social Skills
Songwriting
Spokane
Stroke
Surgeon General
Survey
Tandem
Trauma
War

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT ITGBL1
disease MESH gait
disease DOID post-traumatic stress disorder
disease MESH development
disease MESH PTSD
gene UNIPROT PTPN5
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
drug DRUGBANK Dopamine
gene UNIPROT NXF1
gene UNIPROT SEC14L2
gene UNIPROT USO1
gene UNIPROT FLNB
pathway BSID Release
disease MESH Strokes
gene UNIPROT MAGEE1
disease DOID stroke
gene UNIPROT BAD
disease MESH community
disease MESH autism
disease DOID autism

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