UVA researchers uncover key contributor to multiple sclerosis

UVA researchers uncover key contributor to multiple sclerosis

Publication date: Oct 08, 2019

Scientists had assumed that these cells, known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, could only serve a favorable role in MS. These glial cells make up about 5 percent of the brain and spinal cord, and they play an important and beneficial role by making cells that produce myelin – insulation for nerve cells.

It has been thought that these progenitors do not efficiently give rise to myelin-producing cells in people with MS. Yet, UVA’s Alban Gaultier, PhD, and his team made the surprising discovery that they are also actively participating in the immune system’s harmful attacks on myelin.

The good news: The new insights into the progenitor cells suggest that doctors could potentially manipulate the environment inside the brain to avoid neurodegeneration and promote brain repair.

Alban Gaultier, Department of Neuroscience and Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG), UVA That will be no easy feat, considering the multiple roles these progenitor cells play.

Concepts Keywords
Alban MS
Brain Inflammation
Glial Neuroinflammation
Immune System Multiple sclerosis
Immunology Oligodendrocyte progenitor cell
Inflammation Myelin
Insulation Nervous system
Multiple Sclerosis Organ systems
Myelin Branches of biology
Nerve Cells Glial cells
Neurodegeneration
Neurological
Pathology
PhD
Progenitor Cells
Spinal Cord
UVA
Virginia

Semantics

Type Source Name
gene UNIPROT PTPN5
disease MESH development
disease DOID multiple sclerosis
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
gene UNIPROT TNFSF14
disease MESH inflammation
gene UNIPROT LAT2
gene UNIPROT PDC
pathway BSID Immune System

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