To Investigate the Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Neurophysiological Values and Functionality in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

To Investigate the Effect of Aerobic Exercise on Neurophysiological Values and Functionality in Individuals With Multiple Sclerosis.

Publication date: Oct 10, 2019

Multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, is characterized by myelin, oligodendrocytes and axon damage. Physical exercises can be beneficial to patients, reduce fatigue and improve their strength, endurance and quality of life. Exercise has the potential to improve and / or preserve functionality, aerobic condition, strength, fatigue, health-related quality of life, depression, and cognition in MS patients. It has been reported that aerobic exercise increases muscle strength and endurance in peak oxygen intake and decreases fatigue and improves activity level, balance and walking patterns. It is important to control the problems caused by ataxia in MS patients, to improve balance and postural reactions and to increase proximal muscle and trunk stabilization. For this purpose, movements are voluntarily and graded. Progress in exercises is achieved by making changes in the speed, width and complexity of movement. However, Frenkel Coordination exercises for extremity ataxia are usually included in the physiotherapy and rehabilitation program. Little is known about the role and function of the iris in the nervous system with the discovery of Irisin and its precursor protein FNDC5. Evidence that the plasma level of iris increases during physical exercise suggests that it may also have beneficial and neuroprotective effects in the brain. Increased physical exercise has been shown to be associated with FNDC5 expression and ultimately more secretion of the iris. The effect of elevated plasma iris levels after aerobic exercise on functionality in MS patients is unknown. Moon et al. Observed that cellular proliferation in mouse hippocampus cells was dose-dependent due to iris. In spraque dawley-type male rats, the presence of significant iris in the myelin sheath of the skeletal muscle shows that this tissue is an important source of iris. Based on these findings, it is thought that exercise-induced iris, which is an important cause of disability in MS, may have beneficial effects on the recovery of normal function in these patients. Whether iris affects nerve conduction velocity will be determined by electromyography analysis before and after aerobic exercise. In addition, the relationship between aerobic exercise and motor and sensory function and iris will be investigated and evaluated with functional tests.

Concepts Keywords
Aerobic MS
Aerobic Exercise Extremity ataxia
Alpha Motor Neuron Fatigue
Alpha Motor Neurons Ataxia
Ataxia Physiotherapy
Axon Medicine
Bicycle Medical specialties
Biochemistry Health
Blood Exercise physiology
Borg Physical exercise
Brain Respiratory physiology
Brake Sports medicine
Carbon Dioxide Aerobic exercise
Central Nervous System VO2 max
Centrifugation Ataxia
Cognition Alpha
Control Group
Cycling
Depression
Diplopia
Disability
Electromyography
ELISA
EMG
Ergometer
Fatigue
Functional Tests
Gel
Heart Rate
Hippocampus
Iris
Leeds
MBS
Median Nerve
Monosynaptic
Moon
Motor Nerves
Multiple Sclerosis
Muscle
Myelin
Myelin Sheath
Nerve Conduction Velocity
Nervous System
Neuromuscular Disorder
Neurophysiological
Neuroprotective
Oligodendrocytes
Orthopedic
Oxygen
Oxygen Saturation
Peak
Physical Exercise
Physiotherapy
Physiotherapy Rehabilitation
Plasma
Proximal
Pulmonary
Randomization
Reflex
RER
Respiration
Respiratory Rate
Skeletal Muscle
Spasticity
Steroid
Synapse
Tibial Nerve
VO2 Max
VO2max

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH ataxia
drug DRUGBANK Isoxaflutole
drug DRUGBANK Oxygen
disease MESH depression
gene UNIPROT MAGEE1
disease DOID Multiple Sclerosis
disease MESH Multiple Sclerosis
gene UNIPROT FNDC5
disease MESH electromyography
disease MESH visual
disease MESH diplopia
gene UNIPROT NR4A2
gene UNIPROT ALG3

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