Racial and Socioeconomic Factors Associated with the Use of Complementary and Alternative Modalities for Pain in Cancer Outpatients: An Integrative Review.

Publication date: Jan 09, 2020

Racial and ethnic disparities in pain management are widely documented in the United States. The 2016 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines for opioid prescribing have generated new imperatives for using complementary and alternative medicine approaches (CAM) to manage chronic pain, including cancer pain. This review’s purpose was to explore the prevalence of CAM use for cancer-related pain among racial and ethnic minorities and to organize these findings according to the CAM modalities proposed by the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH).

An integrative review of the literature published between 2007 and 2017.

PubMed and SCOPUS databases (2007-2017).

Articles were included if they engaged in explicit analysis of racial or ethnic differences in CAM use for cancer pain in the outpatient setting, yielding 13 articles for final analysis.

Overall, CAM use for any modality ranged from 51% to 83%. Mind-body therapies were reported most, and energy therapies the least. Differences in CAM use were most often attributable to socioeconomic status (SES), with those of higher SES associated with greater use of practitioner-assisted CAM therapies and those of lower SES with greater use of free therapies. This difference has implications for achieving adequate and consistent pain relief among subgroups of patients with cancer. This review also identifies a literature gap regarding racial/ethnic disparities in access to CAM for cancer pain, and a need for validated measures to assess CAM use.

Ludwick, A., Corey, K., and Meghani, S. Racial and Socioeconomic Factors Associated with the Use of Complementary and Alternative Modalities for Pain in Cancer Outpatients: An Integrative Review. 04500. 2020 Pain Manag Nurs.

Concepts Keywords
CAM Energy therapies
Cancer Pain
CDC Prevalence CAM cancer
Chronic Pain Chronic pain
Energy Therapies Pain management
Ethnic Minorities Mind body therapies
Modality Perception
NCCIH Acute pain
Opioid Medicine
Pain Senses
Pain Management Pseudoscience
PubMed Alternative medicine
SCOPUS Socioeconomic status
SES
Socioeconomic Status
United States

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH Cancer
disease MESH chronic pain

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