Incentives to Decrease Opioid Use – Pilot

Incentives to Decrease Opioid Use – Pilot

Publication date: Jan 22, 2020

The purpose of this study is to address two key questions in the literature on incentives for substance use. The first question is whether it is more effective to directly incentivize the outcome of interest – drug abstinence – or to incentivize behaviors that are inputs into the production of abstinence. This study will compare two versions of the incentive program: one that incentivizes inputs to achieving abstinence, and one that incentivizes the outcome of abstinence. To address differential test submission rates, the study will measure the impacts of the intervention with urine drug-tests administered identically to patients in both treatments. In addition, the study will test a novel combination of baseline survey data and preferences among future incentive programs to provide data on why and for whom incentives for inputs and outputs are differently effective. The second question is how to optimize the size of incentives over time to maximize incentive effectiveness. This will be done by randomly varying the size and timing of incentives offered to participants in both the Inputs and Outcomes groups. The incentive amounts will then be varied across participants and time to fit a structural model of abstinence behaviors over time. The model will be used to describe the optimal shape of incentives over time.

Concepts Keywords
Abstinence Drug rehabilitation
Addiction RTT
Alcohol Substance-related disorders
Android Psychoactive drugs
Aurora Human behavior
Cocaine Substance dependence
Cognitive Impairment Substance abuse
Control Group Ketones
Counseling Opioid use disorder
Debit Card Addiction
Differential Incentive
Distal Smartphone
Drug Abuse Android
DSM GPS
GPS Tracking
Informed Consent
Integral
IOS
Logistics
Methadone
Mobile Application
Nicotine
Opioid
Opioid Addiction
Opioids
Pharmacotherapy
Prize
Proximal
Psychosis
Saliva
Selfie
Smartphone
Substance Abuse
Survey
Tobacco
Turnkey
Urine Drug Tests

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH opioid related disorders
drug DRUGBANK Methyltestosterone
disease MESH psychosis
disease MESH cognitive impairment

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