No Immediate Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation at Various Intensities on Cerebral Blood Flow in People with Multiple Sclerosis.

Publication date: Feb 04, 2020

Animal and transcranial magnetic stimulation motors have evoked potential studies suggesting that the currently used transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) intensities produce measurable physiological changes. However, the validity, mechanisms, and general efficacy of this stimulation modality are currently being scrutinized. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex tDCS on cerebral blood flow. A sample of three people with multiple sclerosis underwent two blocks of five randomly assigned tDCS intensities (1, 2, 3, 4 mA, and sham; 5 min each) and [O]water positron emission tomography imaging. The relative regional (i.e., areas under the electrodes) and global cerebral blood flow were calculated. The results revealed no notable differences in regional or global cerebral blood flow from the different tDCS intensities. Thus, 5 min of tDCS at 1, 2, 3, and 4 mA did not result in immediate changes in cerebral blood flow. To achieve sufficient magnitudes of intracranial electrical fields without direct peripheral side effects, novel methods may be required.

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Workman, C.D., Ponto, L.L.B., Kamholz, J., and Rudroff, T. No Immediate Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation at Various Intensities on Cerebral Blood Flow in People with Multiple Sclerosis. 20177. 2020 Brain Sci (10):2.

Concepts Keywords
Cerebral Blood Flow Transcranial direct-current stimulation
Direct Current Electrotherapy
Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Neurotechnology
Evoked Potential Neurophysiology
Modality Neurostimulation
Multiple Sclerosis Clinical medicine
Positron Emission Tomography Branches of biology
Sci Medicine
TDCS Neuroimaging
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Minimally conscious state
Transcranial stimulation
Tomography

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH Cerebral Blood Flow
disease MESH Multiple Sclerosis
drug DRUGBANK Water

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