Biased Opioid Agonists for Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal in OUD

Biased Opioid Agonists for Treatment of Opioid Withdrawal in OUD

Publication date: Mar 20, 2020

Background: People with opioid-use disorder (OUD) might benefit from having more treatment drugs to choose from. A new drug, TRV734, could be used like methadone to treat OUD. It might not have as many side effects. Objective: To test if TRV734 relieves withdrawal symptoms and has fewer side effects than oxycodone in people with OUD. Eligibility: People ages 18-75 who have been receiving daily treatment with methadone for opioid use disorder for at least 3 months Design: Participants will be screened under Protocol 415. They will be screened with: Medical, social, and psychiatric history Physical exam Electrocardiogram (ECG). For this, sticky pads will be placed on the participant s chest to monitor their heartbeat. Blood and urine tests Participants will stay in a residential unit for 13-26 days. Most days, participants will receive their regular daily dose of methadone. On 4 or 5 occasions, 3-4 days apart, participants will skip two doses of methadone in a row. About 4 hours after they skip the second dose, they will have an IV catheter inserted with a needle so that blood samples can be taken. They will take capsules of either oxycodone, a placebo, or the study drug. They will have an ECG. They will complete questionnaires. Their blood pressure, pupil size, and alertness will be tested. They will then take their usual dose of methadone. Participants will give daily urine and breath samples.

Concepts Keywords
Abstinence Antibiotics
Adrenal Insufficiency Vasectomy
African American Barrier contraception
Agonist Catheter
Alcohol Hysterectomy
Analgesia Contraception
Analgesic Oral contraceptives
Antiarrhythmics Psychotic bipolar disorder
Antibiotics Vomiting
Antidepressants Bouts diarrhea
Antiemetics Vasectomy azoospermia
Antihistamines Opioids
Antipsychotics Drugs
Anxiety Psychoactive drugs
Avoid Pregnancy RTT
Azoospermia Euphoriants
Barrier Contraception Morphinans
Benzodiazepine Drug rehabilitation
Bioavailability Methadone
Bipolar Disorder Opioid use disorder
Blood Buprenorphine
Blood Pressure Substance dependence
Breastfeeding
Buprenorphine
Capsules
Catheter
Chills
Cirrhosis
Clinical Trial
Cognitive Impairment
Condom
Congenital
Contraception
Controlled Experiment
CYP3A4
Diaphragm
Diarrhea
Differential
Double Blind
DSM
ECG
Electrocardiogram
Electrolyte Abnormalities
Epilepsy
Experimental Design
FSH
Hypnotic
Hypocalcemia
Hypokalemia
Hypomagnesemia
Hysterectomy
Informed Consent
Intrauterine Device
Intravenous
Ischemic Heart Disease
IU
IUD
Major Depressive Disorder
Menarche
Menopausal
Menopause
Methadone
Nausea
Nephrotic Syndrome
Neuropsychopharmacology
NIH
Oophorectomy
Opioid
Opioid Addiction
Opioid Withdrawal
Opioids
Oral Contraceptives
Oxycodone
Physical Exam
Physically Dependent
Placebo
Postmenopausal
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Test
Progesterone
Protocol
Psychotic
Public Health
Pulmonary
Receptor
Respiratory Depression
Runny Nose
Sedation
Sedative
Serum
Sperm
Spermicide
Surgical Sterilization
Syndrome
Thyroid Disease
Tolerability
Tubal Ligation
Unit 13
Urine
Vasectomy
Vomiting
Withdrawal Symptoms

Semantics

Type Source Name
drug DRUGBANK Methadone
disease MESH withdrawal symptoms
drug DRUGBANK Oxycodone
drug DRUGBANK Chorionic Gonadotropin (Human)
drug DRUGBANK Progesterone
drug DRUGBANK Follitropin
disease MESH men
disease MESH azoospermia
disease MESH anxiety
disease MESH bipolar disorder
disease MESH Major Depressive Disorder
drug DRUGBANK Ethanol
drug DRUGBANK Benzodiazepine
disease MESH cognitive impairment
disease MESH pulmonary disease
disease MESH cirrhosis
disease MESH nephrotic syndrome
disease MESH thyroid disease
disease MESH epilepsy
disease MESH adrenal insufficiency
disease MESH ischemic heart disease
disease MESH abnormalities
disease MESH hypokalemia
disease MESH hypocalcemia
disease MESH heart disease
disease MESH Drug Abuse

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