Fountain of youth: HTT protein repairs neurons by maintaining youthful state

Fountain of youth: HTT protein repairs neurons by maintaining youthful state

Publication date: May 12, 2020

A team of scientists has recently published their findings on how our bodies are able to repair brain and spinal cord injuries. Repairing nervous system damage – the holy grail of medical scienceIt has long been the ambition of many scientists to find ways to help repair damage to the brain and spinal cord. One of the ways we can repair damage to the nervous system is by using a type of stem cell that can readily become a brain cell. Scientists are able to graft NPCs onto the areas of the nervous system which are damaged, in a similar way to how we transplant tissues and organs. Once grafted on, the NPCs help the other cells grow and reconnect with each other, restoring function to the damaged area of the nervous system. Modern tools helping to answer age-old questionsProfessor Mark Tuszynski and colleagues are interested in researching exactly how NPC grafts can help repair brain and spinal cord damage. Scientists in the team hypothesise that reverting to an immature or embryonic state helped the injured cells to regrow and promoted repair of damage. In fact, when the scientists looked at nerve damage in mouse models which had huntingtin deleted from the spine, recovery from spinal cord injury was reduced by 60% – a huge effect!

Concepts Keywords
Avid Stem cells
Brain Neuroscience
Brain Cell Neurodegeneration
Clinical Trial S disease
Dogma Nervous system injuries
Gene Spinal injuries
Genetic Branches of biology
Graft Organ systems
Grafted Neuroscience
Grafting Huntingtin
Holy Grail Huntington’s disease
Huntingtin Neuroregeneration
Huntington Spinal cord
Mutation Nerve
Nature Stem cell
Nerve Nervous system
Nerve Cells
Nerve Regeneration
Nervous System
Neurodegeneration
Neurons
Neuroscience
NPC
NPCs
Organ
Progenitor Cells
Protein
Spinal Cord
Spinal Cord Injuries
Spinal Cord Injury
Stem Cells

Semantics

Type Source Name
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
disease MESH development

Original Article

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