Huntington’s update: optimal treatment times and implicated molecules

Huntington’s update: optimal treatment times and implicated molecules

Publication date: May 29, 2020

Research has revealed that brain changes in Huntington’s disease (HD) can be detected 24 years ahead of the emergence of clinical symptoms.

Professor Sarah Tabrizi from the University College London (UCL) Huntington’s Disease Centre and UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology, who led the study, said: -Ultimately, our goal is to deliver the right drug at the right time to effectively treat this disease – ideally we would like to delay or prevent neurodegeneration while function is still intact, giving gene carriers many more years of life without impairment.

Co-first author of the study, Dr Paul Zeun, from the UCL Huntington’s Disease Research Centre said: -We have found what could be the earliest Huntington’s-related changes, in a measure which could be used to monitor and gauge effectiveness of future treatments in gene carriers without symptoms. “

Co-first author of the study, Dr Rachael Scahill, also from the UCL Huntington’s Disease Research Centre added: -Other studies have found that subtle cognitive, motor and neuropsychiatric impairments can appear 10-15 years before disease onset.

-If one looks back in the literature of the Huntington’s disease field many people have postulated that reductions to IL-6 would be therapeutic in HD,” said study senior author, Myriam Heiman, associate professor in Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT’s) Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences and a member of The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard.

Concepts Keywords
Brain Scientists
Cambridge Sarah Tabrizi
Clinical Trials Huntington’s disease
Cognitive Hereditary neurodegenerative disease
Cognitive Behavioural
Control Group
Cross
Fluid
Genetic
Great Strides
Harvard
Huntington
Interleukin 6
Iowa
Knockout
Lancet
London
Massachusetts
Mice
MIT
MITs
Murine
Mutation
Nerve
Neurodegeneration
Neurodegenerative Disease
Neurofilament
Neurology
Neurons
Neuropsychiatric
NfL
Perturbation
Phenotype
Protein
Queen Square
Sequencing
Spinal Fluid
Striatum
Synapses
Synaptic

Semantics

Type Source Name
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
disease MESH development
disease MESH hereditary neurodegenerative disease

Original Article

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