5 things to know about this relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment that comes in a pill

5 things to know about this relapsing multiple sclerosis (MS) treatment that comes in a pill

Publication date: Aug 08, 2020

Discover a once-daily pill for people living with relapsing MS: ZEPOSIA(R) (ozanimod) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), to include clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting disease, and active secondary progressive disease, in adults.

ZEPOSIA is a once-daily pill Unlike many treatments for MS, ZEPOSIA is a pill that you take once a day.

FEWER RELAPSES In a one-year study, people who took ZEPOSIA had 48% fewer relapses than people who took a leading injectable medicine.

And in a two-year study, people who took ZEPOSIA had 38% fewer relapses than with a leading injectable.

† †In the one-year study, people taking ZEPOSIA had an Annualized Relapse Rate (ARR) of 0. 181 vs 0. 350 with a leading injectable.

MORE PEOPLE WERE RELAPSE FREE In the one-year study, 78% of people who took ZEPOSIA were relapse free at one year (versus 66% of people who took a leading injectable).

And in the two-year study, 76% of people who took ZEPOSIA were relapse free at two years (versus 64% of people who took a leading injectable).

FEWER NEW OR ENLARGING LESIONS (T2), TOO The one-year study also showed that people taking ZEPOSIA had 48% fewer new or enlarging lesions (T2) than people who took a leading injectable medicine.

And in the two-year study, people taking ZEPOSIA had 42% fewer new or enlarging lesions (T2) than with a leading injectable.

> >In the one-year study, people taking ZEPOSIA had an average of 1. 47 lesions (T2) vs 2. 84 with a leading injectable.

Possible serious side effects These are the serious side effects reported by people who took ZEPOSIA during the clinical studies.

Infections that can be life-threatening and cause death Slow heart rate when you start taking ZEPOSIA Liver problems Increased blood pressure Breathing problems, such as shortness of breath Macular edema (a vision problem) Swelling and narrowing of blood vessels in your brain Severe worsening of MS after stopping ZEPOSIA compared to before or during treatment Allergic reactions To learn more about these side effects and the possible symptoms, please see the Important Safety Information below.

Most common side effects During both of the clinical studies, people who took ZEPOSIA were asked to report any side effects that they experienced.

Call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of these symptoms of an infection during treatment with ZEPOSIA and for 3 months after your last dose of ZEPOSIA: fever feeling very tired flu-like symptoms cough painful and frequent urination (signs of a urinary tract infection) rash headache with fever, neck stiffness, sensitivity to light, nausea, or confusion (symptoms of meningitis, an infection of the lining around your brain and spine) Your healthcare provider may delay starting or may stop your ZEPOSIA treatment if you have an infection.

If you are a female who can become pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider about what birth control method is right for you during your treatment with ZEPOSIA and for 3 months after you stop taking ZEPOSIA are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

Concepts Keywords
Allergic Reaction Disease
Allergic Reactions MS treatment
Antiarrhythmics Provider symptoms infection
Avonex Questions healthcare team
Biogen Reason healthcare
Birth Control Healthcare provider conditions
Blind Spot Healthcare provider medicines
Blood Treatment talk healthcare
Blood Pressure Healthcare team
Blood Test Alemtuzumab
Bradyarrhythmia Biogen
Brain Ozanimod
Breast Interferon beta-1a
Breast Milk Autoimmune diseases
Breastfeed Immunology
Breastfeeding Organ systems
Bristol Myers Squibb Medical specialties
Celgene Corporation Birth control
Central Texas Uveitis
Chickenpox Syndrome
Cyclosporine Bradyarrhythmia
CYP2C8 Untreated lead stroke
Depression Heart attack
Diabetes Rash itchy hives
Disability Pain
ECG
Edema
Edward Fox
Electrocardiogram
Encephalopathy
FDA
Fever
Frequent Urination
Healthcare
Heart Attack
Heart Rate
Hives
Hypertensive Crisis
Immune System
Infection
Inflammation
Insurance
Interferon Beta 1a
Liver
Lymphocytes
Macular Edema
Medicine
Meningitis
Multiple Sclerosis
Nausea
Neurological
Pain Medicine
Pharmacist
Physical Disability
Progressive
Rash
Registered Trademark
Relapse
Respiratory Tract
Stroke
Trademark
Upper Respiratory Tract
Urinary Tract
Uveitis
Vaccine
Varicella Zoster
Virus

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH urinary tract infection
drug DRUGBANK Coenzyme M
disease MESH Upper respiratory tract infections
disease MESH Low blood pressure
disease MESH Back pain
disease MESH High blood pressure
disease MESH Allergic reactions
disease MESH multiple sclerosis
pathway REACTOME Immune System
disease MESH chest pain
disease MESH bradyarrhythmia
disease MESH meningitis
disease MESH confusion
disease MESH Macular edema
drug DRUGBANK Ozanimod
disease MESH syndrome
drug DRUGBANK Interferon beta-1a
disease MESH relapses
disease MESH Infections
disease MESH death
drug DRUGBANK Rifampicin
drug DRUGBANK Eltrombopag
drug DRUGBANK Ciclosporin
pathway KEGG Breast cancer
disease MESH breast cancer
drug DRUGBANK Clopidogrel
drug DRUGBANK Gemfibrozil
drug DRUGBANK Alemtuzumab
disease MESH inflammation
disease MESH uveitis
disease MESH sleep
disease MESH heart attack
disease MESH stroke
disease MESH arrhythmia
disease MESH chickenpox
disease MESH orthostatic hypotension
disease MESH hives
drug DRUGBANK Tropicamide
disease MESH Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome
disease MESH blind spot
disease MESH depression
drug DRUGBANK Tyramine

Original Article

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