Meaning and purpose in Huntington's disease: a longitudinal study of its impact on quality of life.

Publication date: Jul 20, 2021

Previous work in Huntington’s disease (HD) has shown that a sense of meaning and purpose (M&P) is positively associated with positive affect and well-being (PAW); however, it was unknown whether HD-validated patient-reported outcomes (PROs) influence this association and how M&P impacts PROs in the future. Our study was designed to examine if HD-validated PROs moderate the relationship between M&P and PAW and to evaluate if baseline M&P predicts 12- and 24-month changes in HD-validated PROs. This was a longitudinal, multicenter study to develop several PROs (e. g., specific for the physical, emotional, cognitive, and social domains) for people with HD (HDQLIFE). The sample consisted of 322 people with HD (n = 50 prodromal, n = 171 early-stage manifest, and n = 101 late-stage manifest HD). A single, multivariate linear mixed-effects model was performed with PAW as the outcome predicted by main effects for M&P and several moderators (i. e., an HD-validated PRO) and interactions between M&P and a given PRO. Linear-mixed models were also used to assess if baseline M&P predicted HD-validated PROs at 12 and 24 months. Higher M&P was positively associated with higher PAW regardless of the magnitude of symptom burden, as represented by HD-validated PROs, and independent of disease stage. In our primary analysis, baseline M&P predicted increased PAW and decreased depression, anxiety, anger, emotional/behavioral disruptions, and cognitive decline at 12 and 24 months across all disease stages. These findings parallel those seen in the oncology population and have implications for adapting and developing psychotherapeutic and palliative HD interventions.

Concepts Keywords
24months Patient-reported outcome
Anger Clinical research
Hdqlife Clinical data management
Moderators Quality of life
Psychotherapeutic

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH cognitive decline
disease MESH anxiety
disease MESH depression

Original Article

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