Handedness in autism spectrum disorders and intellectually disabled children and adolescents – Contrasting caregivers’ reports with assessments of hand preference.

Handedness in autism spectrum disorders and intellectually disabled children and adolescents – Contrasting caregivers’ reports with assessments of hand preference.

Publication date: Feb 29, 2024

A higher rate of atypical handedness prevalence (non-right-handedness or left-, mixed-hand dominance) has been recurrently reported in individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared to individuals with other types of developmental disabilities. However, the exact magnitude of this difference as well as the presence of possible contributing factors remained unknown. The main aim of this study was to understand caregivers’ impression of the handedness of their child with developmental disabilities and its relationship with assessments of the child using a hand preference scale. The sample of the present study was 1116 individuals with developmental disabilities from two countries, 541 (51. 5%) individuals from Iran and 575 (48. 5%) individuals from the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). The handedness of the sample was evaluated based on the parental report and utilizing a standardized scale (The Hand-Preference Demonstration Test “HPDT”). There was a statistically significant difference between caregivers’ reports on their dependents’ handedness and the application of a valid hand preference scale and they do not necessarily overlap. There was a statistically significant relationship between handedness and type of developmental disabilities based on caregivers’ reports and individuals with ASD were more non-right-handed compared to individuals with ID based on the caregivers’ report. Hence similar difference was not seen between the ASD and ID groups when HDTP was applied as a diagnostic scale. While left-handedness in the ASD and ID group was similar (23-24%), mixed-handedness in the ASD group was 38% compared to 33% in the ID group. The Hand-Preference Demonstration Test (HPDT) was a valid way to determine the hand preference of individuals with ASD and ID. It is concluded that parental reports on their offspring with ASD’s hand preference need to be approved through the application of a scale and caregivers and professionals need to be more aware of early motor symptoms such as handedness. Further research should focus on the role of handedness in the development of fine motor skills and eye-hand coordination in children with differing developmental disabilities and variations among those differing impairments.

Concepts Keywords
Autism Autism spectrum disorders
Iraq Handedness
Parental Intellectual disability
Professionals Mixed-handedness
Non-right-handedness

Semantics

Type Source Name
disease MESH autism spectrum disorders
disease MESH developmental disabilities
disease MESH Intellectual disability

Original Article

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *